All posts by Jeff Jones

Another Successful Spiel

The Kakabeka Falls Curling Club had another successful year with the 22nd Annual Jones Insurance Men’s Skins Spiel. It was the second straight year for Zan Lod to be in the A-side finals Sunday afternoon, this year resulting in a win for the Port Arthur Curling Club Skip.

 A-side Final Lod vs. Burgess

Zan Lod rink won

Skip Zan Lod
Vice Rob Shubat
2nd Terry Trewin
Lead Jeff Jones

Defeating Bryan Burgess rink, Pat Berezowski, Greg Hollins, Willem Vellinga

B-side Final Lamke vs. Satten

Norm Lamke rink won

Skip Norm Lamke
Vice Kevan Stranges
2nd Dan Grant
Lead John Pepe

Defeating Mike Satten rink, Casey Niemi, Tom Kompon, Craig Niemi

C-side Final Dubinsky vs. Michalcin

Rob Dubinsky rink won

Skip: Rob Dubinsky
Vice: Tony Barscello
2nd: Tom Posmitiuk
Lead: Dale Dubinsky

Defeating Peter Michalcin rink, Bruno DiGiacinto, Manual Joaquim, Brad Sullivan

Sponsors: Jones Insurance, Firesteel Contractors & The Macsemchuk Family, Superior Coatings, DRD Construction, EKT 90 Inc., Pinewood Ford, Toromont

Fans & Participates enjoyed the live band on Saturday night, as Radar & the Rockets rocked the house.

22nd Annual Men’s Skins Spiel January 18th to 21st, 2018

We are really excited to once again be the presenting sponsor of the 22nd Annual Men’s Skins Spiel at Kakabeka Curling Club on Thursday, January 18th to Sunday, January 21st, 2018. Entry Fee/Team: $200- to mail/drop off fee, or more info contact: Jeff Jones c/o Jones & Associates Insurance 521 Memorial Avenue, Thunder Bay ON P7B 3Y6 766-2086 or jjones@jonesins.com  

KAKABEKA SKINS ENTRY FORM

We have had a busy summer…

Habitat's Stud-A-Thon

  • We were happy to help raise money for Habitat for Humanity in their Habitat Stud-A-Thon
  • Sponsored SHIFT’s 2nd Annual Grub Crawl
  • Along With Gore Mutual we were able to donate $5000 to Our Kids Count breakfast program.

Power Outages- what to do

Most power outages will be over almost as soon as they begin, but some can last much longer – up to days or even weeks. Power outages are often caused by freezing rain, sleet storms and/or high winds which damage power lines and equipment. Cold snaps or heat waves can also overload the electric power system.

During a power outage, you may be left without heating/air conditioning, lighting, hot water, or even running water. If you only have a cordless phone, you will also be left without phone service. In other words, you could be facing major challenges. Everyone has a responsibility to protect their homes and their families.

You can greatly lessen the impact of a power outage by taking the time to prepare in advance. This involves three basic steps:

  1. Find out what to do before, during, and after a power outage.
  2. Make a family emergency plan, so that everyone knows what to do, and where to go in case of an emergency.
  3. Get an emergency kit, so that you and your family can be self-sufficient for at least 72 hours during a power outage.

Planning for a power outage will also help prepare you for other types of emergencies. After reading this guide, keep it in a handy spot, such as in your emergency kit.

http://www.getprepared.gc.ca/cnt/rsrcs/pblctns/pwrtgs-wtd/index-en.aspx

Food Safety During a Power Outage

  • Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible. First use perishable food from the refrigerator. An unopened refrigerator will keep foods cold for about 4 hours.
  • Then use food from the freezer. A full freezer will keep the temperature for about 48 hours (24 hours if it is half full) if the door remains closed.
  • Use your non-perishable foods and staples after using food from the refrigerator and freezer.
  • If it looks like the power outage will continue beyond a day, prepare a cooler with ice for your freezer items.
  • Keep food in a dry, cool spot and keep it covered at all times.

Electrical Equipment During a Blackout

  • Turn off and unplug all unnecessary electrical equipment, including sensitive electronics.
  • Turn off or disconnect any appliances (like stoves), equipment or electronics you were using when the power went out. When power comes back on, surges or spikes can damage equipment.
  • Leave one light turned on so you’ll know when the power comes back on.
  • Eliminate unnecessary travel, especially by car. Traffic lights will be out and roads will be congested.

Caution: Carbon Monoxide Kills

  • Never use a generator, grill, camp stove or other gasoline, propane, natural gas or charcoal-burning devices inside a home, garage, basement, crawlspace or any partially enclosed area. Locate unit away from doors, windows and vents that could allow carbon monoxide to come indoors.
  • The primary hazards to avoid when using alternate sources for electricity, heating or cooking are carbon monoxide poisoning, electric shock, and fire.
  • Install carbon monoxide alarms in central locations on every level of your home and outside sleeping areas to provide early warning of accumulating carbon monoxide.
  • If the carbon monoxide alarm sounds move quickly to a fresh air location outdoors or by an open window or door.
  • Call for help from the fresh air location and remain there until emergency personnel arrive to assist you.